Scientific journal

New Psychological Research

Grebennikova O.V., Golubeva N.A. Socialization in young and mature generations during self-isolation and quarantine

Olga V. Grebennikova, Russian State University for the Humanities, Moscow, Russia; bld. 6, Miusskaya Square, Moscow, Russia, 125993; Psychological Institute of Russian Academy of Education, Moscow, Russia; bld.9‒4, Mokhovaya str., Russia, Moscow, 125009; grebennikova577@mail.ru
Natalya A. Golubeva, Ph.D (Psychology), Russian State University for the Humanities, Moscow, Russia; bld. 6, Miusskaya Square, Moscow, Russia, 125993; Psychological Institute of Russian Academy of Education, Moscow, Russia; bld.9‒4, Mokhovaya str., Russia, Moscow, 125009; 9268881525@gmail.com

The article describes a study of socialization features in young and mature people during self-isolation and COVID-19 quarantine, in particular their awareness and behavior. The empirical research (n = 400) has shown that adults and young people use and trust different sources of information while socializing in the situation of self-isolation and quarantine. In this situation neither of the age groups experience panic but young people are more likely to feel irritated, although they do not see any death threat in the new virus. Young people have a positive attitude to self-isolation and quarantine while older people are calm. Both age groups have changed their daily routines, though all the respondents approve of the introduction of self-isolation and quarantine as a necessary and correct measure. Both young and mature people see the Internet as productive means of socialization in the current situation. However, the attitude to changes in the future is more positive among young people, while the mature generation sees it as ambivalent. This indicates precarity in people’s minds as a result of self-isolation and quarantine. Constant changes in quarantine restriction terms, lack of algorithms or logics in behavior appear to be the strongest stressors for the majority of respondents. People chose to spend free time in different manners according to their age and social status. There is a pronounced discrepancy between the expectations of self-isolation period and the actual results of self-isolation depending on age and social status.

Key words: socialization, uncertainty, self-isolation, quarantine, difficult life situation, awareness, behavior, youth, mature people, stress resistance

For citation: Grebennikova, O.V., Golubeva, N.A. (2021), “Socialization in young and mature people during self-isolation and quarantine”, New Psychological Research, no 1, pp. 93–111, DOI: 10.51217/npsyresearch_2021_01_01_05

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keywords: socialization, uncertainty, self-isolation, quarantine, difficult life situation, awareness, behavior, youth, mature people, stress resistance

received 14 March 2021

published 14 March 2021

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